Election 2018 Members of Parliament parliamentary election Political Landscape tech

The Results of Afghanistan’s 2018 Parliamentary Elections: A new, but incomplete Wolesi Jirga

Afghan women wait in line to cast their votes at a polling centre for the country


Afghan ladies wait in line to forged their votes at a polling centre for the nation’s legislative election in Kandahar on 27 October 2018. Photograph by Javed TANVEER / AFP

The Unbiased Election Fee (IEC) has, in the end, virtually seven months after the poll was held, finalised the results of the 2018 parliamentary elections. The parliament itself is nearly 4 years overdue – the elections ought to have been held in 2015. Even now, Afghanistan doesn’t have a totally newly-elected Wolesi Jirga as Ghazni’s elections have but to happen; they are only deliberate for 28 September 2019 (together with the presidential and provincial council elections). On this piece, AAN researcher Ali Yawar Adili seems to be at why it took so long to finalise the parliamentary elections and concludes that the inefficiencies, lack of clarity and failure to adhere to authorized procedures – by authorities and commissions – is just not encouraging for the upcoming presidential poll. (An inventory of Afghanistan’s new MPs may be read in an annex to this piece.)

Announcement of final outcomes

Late within the evening on 14 Might 2019, the IEC lastly revealed the outcomes of the Kabul vote, thereby concluding the 2018 parliamentary elections, seven months after they have been held on 20 and 21 October. (1) The following day, on the presidential palace, President Ashraf Ghani administered the swearing-in of the new MPs from Kabul and Paktia provinces (different MPs whose results have been introduced earlier had already been sworn in). Ghani referred to as (see the video right here) the seven-month-long election “a catastrophe.” It was, he stated, was the result of the inefficacy of the previous election commissions (the IEC and the Electoral Complaints Commissions, the EEC): “In the history of democratic methods, it is unprecedented that the results of an election should take seven months. I do not discuss different features of it because they’re judicial, however there must be little question that the former fee, both commissions, have been inefficient. There’s a consensus within the country about it.”

The parliamentary elections have been planned for 20 October 2018. By then, the election in Ghazni province had already been cancelled, so on the day itself, voters in solely 33 of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces went to the polls, along with those voting for the nation’s ten Kuchi representatives and one Sikh and Hindu consultant. Even then, not all the polling centres opened. 401 polling centres did not open, stated former IEC chairman Gula Jan Badi Sayyad, because of technical issues or security threats. AAN described the “technical shambles” and “triumph of administrative chaos”. The IEC needed to prolong the elections right into a second day, opening these polling centres that had not opened on 20 October the following day (AAN’s reporting right here).

As well as, the individuals of Kandahar went to forged their votes every week later, on 27 October 2018 (see AAN’s reporting here and here), a delay triggered by the killing of Kandahar’s Chief of Police Basic Abdul Razeq and head of NDS Basic Abdul Momin Hussainkhel two days before the elections had been due (AAN reporting right here).

The new Wolesi Jirga is just not absolutely full, as Ghazni’s elections have yet to be held, one thing which even state officials typically overlook. One of the IEC deputy spokespeople chatting with Arman FM Safayi Shahr-e Programme on 15 Might concerning the Kabul election results advised the radio listeners that the IEC had “ended the parliamentary elections.” One of many presenters quipped, “Did you exclude Ghazni from the listing?” The IEC had dropped the Wolesi Jirga elections in Ghazni after the federal government did not resolve competing calls for concerning the measurement of the constituency (AAN’s reporting here and right here). These elections at the moment are scheduled for 28 September together with the presidential and provincial council elections. Nevertheless, the constituency dispute remains unresolved and should but resurface as soon as the IEC begins voter registration there. In accordance with article 104 of the electoral regulation, if elections are postponed or suspended, members of the elected bodies (for example the Wolesi Jirga) should continue to serve of their positions until the holding of a new election and announcement of its results. To date, in line with an MP from Ghazni, ten out of the 11 MPs stay in parliament: the eleventh, Chaman Shah Etemadi, was appointed the new head of the ECC secretariat.

Hasty inauguration of a brand new, incomplete parliament virtually four years late

In response to article 83 of the structure, the Wolesi Jirga’s time period ended on 1 Sartan 1394 (22 June 2015) and a brand new parliament needed to have been inaugurated after elections which should have been held 30 to 60 days earlier than that. (2) Nevertheless, when the Nationwide Unity Authorities (NUG) was shaped in the wake of the disputed 2014 presidential elections, it dedicated to finishing up elementary electoral reform. More than three years have been spent working on reforms, however little was achieved. This era, as AAN reported (see section two of AAN’s file here), was characterised by the NUG leaders’ wrangling over the establishment of the Special Electoral Reform Fee (SERC) (which had been envisaged in the NUG’s 2014 political deal); the SERC’s discussions and proposals for electoral reform; parliament’s rejection of presidential legislative decrees that had adopted a few of the SERC’s suggestions, and, lastly; modifications to the electoral regulation which have been endorsed by legislative decree and the appointment of latest electoral commissioners for the IEC and the ECC.

All this meant that the new parliament was inaugurated on 26 April 2019, virtually 4 years after the constitutional end of the previous parliament’s term. (3) Moreover, it was inaugurated regardless of the truth that the final outcomes from Kabul and Paktia had not but been announced. A total of 38 seats (33 for Kabul and 5 for Paktia) have been empty on the day of the inauguration. The IEC announced the ultimate results of the Wolesi Jirga elections for Paktia province two days later and Kabul more than two weeks after that.

Equally, on the day of the inauguration, the IEC rapidly launched the ultimate results for three different excellent provinces (Maidan Wardak, Kunduz and Baghlan) in addition to those for the Kuchi constituency (five seats for Maidan Wardak, nine for Kunduz, eight for Baghlan and ten for the Kuchis). It’s unclear whether or not or not the new MPs from these constituencies have been capable of take part in the inauguration at such brief discover (until that they had been informed before the release of the outcomes that they might be winners and have been subsequently ready to take part in the inauguration). MP Halima Askari from Maidan Wardak informed AAN on 15 Might that the five MPs from her province had been capable of attend the inauguration, but had not but acquired their election credentials from the IEC certifying that they had been elected.

Two days before the inauguration of the parliament, on 24 April 2019, the IEC granted election credentials to 89 MPs from ten provinces (Kandahar, Helmand, Ghor, Badghis, Logar, Nangrahar, Herat, Takhar, Paktika and Balkh as well as the Hindu and Sikh constituency). IEC head Hawa Alam Nuristani stated that the final results for these ten provinces and communities had been released by the brand new management of the IEC. A couple of months earlier, on 9 February, the former IEC granted credentials to 80 profitable candidates from 18 provinces: Bamyan, Daikundi, Jawzjan, Uruzgan, Laghman, Kapisa, Zabul, Panjshir, Parwan, Khost, Samangan, Badakhshan, Faryab, Sar-e Pul, Farah, Nimruz, Kunar and Nuristan (the former IEC had, in truth, finalised the results of solely these 18 provinces before its members have been all sacked).

Article 88 of the electoral regulation says that election credentials must be awarded to the members of the Wolesi Jirga following the announcement of the final election results. (4) Yet, in complete, solely 169 new MPs out of a complete of 250 had been absolutely accepted nicely prematurely of the inauguration; 70 other MPs had both not had their results, or not completed the procedure yet (ie, had not but acquired their election certificates). Also, ten former MPs from Ghazni participated within the inauguration. (5)

Nevertheless, President Ghani did not mention the hastiness of the occasion, saying solely that the ultimate outcomes of the parliamentary elections for Kabul had not but been introduced: “I’m sorry that the Kabul MPs aren’t of their seats. I wish the Kabul MPs have been current [here] to take heed to our programmes for Kabul city and Kabul province.”. As an alternative, President Ghani claimed that: “We inaugurated the meeting on the auspicious day of Friday to point out that the president and the management of the Nationwide Unity Authorities can’t tolerate [even] one moment of procrastination in the inauguration of the Nationwide Assembly.” Nevertheless, the push to inaugurate the brand new parliament appeared to have been motivated fairly by the necessity for elected MPs to attend the consultative peace Loya Jirga, which was held from 29 April to 3 Might (see AAN’s reporting right here and right here).

Atta Muhammad Dehqanpur, an MP from Ghor province, had been elected because the interim speaker to preside over the inauguration on 26 April. This was in accordance with article four of the Wolesi Jirga Guidelines of Procedures which says that the oldest member must be appointed as professional tem speaker and the two youngest members ought to be appointed as professional tem deputy speaker and secretary. (6). Their obligation can also be to supervise the election of a everlasting speaker, who will then supervise the election of the remainder of the administrative boards.

The Wolesi Jirga had planned to carry its first plenary session on 11 Might following the inauguration and to then elect its administrative board.‌ Nevertheless, a number of the Kabul candidates and their supporters gathered in front of the parliament and blocked the MPs’ entry as they didn’t want the elections for the administrative board to be held in their absence (which is sensible provided that Kabul is the most important constituency with 33 seats) (See a media report here). Based on article 87 of the constitution, the Wolesi Jirga ought to elect one member because the speaker for 5 years, and two members as the primary and second deputy speakers and two members as the secretary and deputy secretary for one yr.  (7)

On 16 Might, the Wolesi Jirga carried out voting for the speaker. It was inconclusive. There were four candidates: Mir Rahman Rahmani (Parwan) who was the top of the financial system fee in earlier parliament (75 votes), Kamal Naser Osuli (Khost) who was beforehand head of the schooling/greater schooling fee (69 votes), Mirwais Yasini (Nangahar) (59 votes) and Omar Nasir Mujaddedi (Herat) (seven votes). The runoff will now be held between Rahmani and Osuli, in response to Ghulam Hussain Naseri (Maidan Wardak) on Saturday, 18 Might (media report right here).

The second round could be onerous fought and drawn-out. The earlier Wolesi Jirga elected its speaker only one month and two days after its inauguration, after its members sat by way of sixteen periods, with eighteen candidates competing in 4 rounds of balloting. Then, MPs used clean votes to stop the election of any speaker. (AAN’s reporting here).

Change of commissioners

The 2018 parliamentary elections have been administered by two totally different sets of commissions. On 22 November 2016, the 12 new electoral commissioners (seven for the IEC and 5 for the ECC) have been sworn in at the presidential palace for a period of 5 and three years (see AAN’s reporting here). These commissions ready for and held the parliamentary elections. The commissioners have been in the midst of finalising the results and had introduced them for 18 provinces once they have been replaced by the new set of commissioners. This was finished after rising calls by election observers and political events for them to be dismissed and replaced. They have been accused of misconduct and mismanagement and of being unfit to manage the upcoming presidential elections (AAN reporting right here).

Apparently, a few of the Kabul candidates have been among the new commissioners who adjudicated or announced the ultimate outcomes. Nevertheless, that they had not gained seats, in response to the preliminary results, so their adjudication of the results made no difference of their favour.

Controversy across the Kabul elections

The Kabul vote was questioned from the very beginning not solely by candidates but in addition by IEC officers themselves. They included on 20 November, the appearing head of the IEC workplace for Kabul, Zahir Akbari, who resigned from his submit in protest at “widespread fraud and corruption allegations.” He stated the elections in Kabul had been designed and carried out by a corrupt circle led by the top of the IEC secretariat Akbari Zamanzai. He had been referred to as in to take over from Awal ul-Rahman Rudwal as head of the IEC’s Kabul workplace after he, Zamanzai and numerous different officers had been accused of violating the regulation. On 2 December, the IEC suspended its appearing head of subject operations for Kabul province, Obaidullah Niazi, for alleged bribe-taking. Niazi had solely taken up the job very lately following the alternative of the whole provincial IEC office for Kabul. (AAN reporting right here).

On 6 December, the ECC nullified all outcomes for Kabul province. (Eight) It cited mismanagement, violations of the electoral regulation, dereliction of obligation by the IEC and a scarcity of transparency as the primary reasons. The IEC instantly condemned the ECC’s step as “hasty, unrealistic and political[ly motivated]” and as “disregard and disrespect of the efforts and the sacrifices on the day of elections.” The ECC subsequently withdrew its choice. Each IEC and ECC commissioners have been fired by President Ghani before they might resolve the dispute over the Kabul vote. After the new commissioners took over, the ECC held session conferences with the political events and civil society organisations on the Kabul vote (it’s because the ECC had not adjudicated the complaints once they have been fired).

The new ECC then annulled the previous recount and audits carried out by the previous commissioners and carried out a new recount and an audit based mostly on the end result sheets of the election days. (9) Chaman Shah Etemadi, the top of the ECC, had informed the media that the sooner audit and recount not only had not resulted within the transparency of the outcomes but in addition prompted more “injury.” He stated that if the ECC could possibly be provided with 50 per cent of the end result sheets from the primary and second day of elections, the vote can be legitimised; otherwise, it’d determine to nullify the votes totally.

Muhammad Qasem Elyasi, the secretary and spokesman for the ECC who was himself a candidate from Kabul, informed Etilaat Roz on 12 Might that 12 per cent of the Kabul votes had been lacking and that the probably choice was that the final outcomes for Kabul can be announced based mostly on 88 per cent of the votes. The ECC advised media on 7 Might that it had despatched its selections to the IEC. It then took the IEC every week to lastly publish the results on 14 Might.

The new commissioners confirmed a lot of the candidates who had been named as winners in the preliminary outcomes and replaced 4: Ajmal Gulab, Ahmad Zia Azemi Shinuzada, Muhammad Farhad Sediqi and Salima Nikbin have been replaced by Abdul Razaq Istalefi, Erfanullah Erfan, Muhammad Naim Wardak and Parwin Durani. Salima Nikbin and Ajmal Gulab are sad with the final outcomes: Nikbin alleged to the media that she had been on the listing after the ECC’s adjudication, however had been excluded nonetheless because she lacks political help; Gulab claimed his identify had been eliminated at the behest of the Palace.

IEC and ECC officers acknowledged there were problems with the Kabul vote. The ECC finally permitted the outcomes based mostly on 88 per cent of the outcome sheets from the election days (Etilaat Roz reported) on 16 Might that it had obtained paperwork displaying that only 70 of the end result sheets had been obtainable and the remaining 30 had been missing). A single vote can matter in elections, so the absence of 12 (or 30) per cent of them is questionable.

Conclusion: Some lessons from the 2018 parliamentary elections

The inefficiency of the former commissioners was cited as the primary cause for the issues with the 2018 parliamentary elections. Nevertheless, in reality, there have been many different issues within the parliamentary elections.

  • First, the principles of the game have been by no means clear properly prematurely of the elections. For example, only a month before the elections, the IEC was pressured by political events and the government to make a last-minute compromise and use biometric voter verification on election day (see AAN’s background of the difficulty right here). In consequence, because the writer wrote at the time, the biometric machines, meant to serve as a panacea for all election ills, became a headache through the ballot. These with a say in how the elections have been going to be delivered – the federal government, political events and the IEC – should have agreed on the principles nicely prematurely.
  • Second, there was a transparent disregard on the a part of each the federal government and the IEC for legal procedure. For example, based on the electoral regulation, the postponement of the district council elections and the Wolesi Jirga elections in Ghazni needed to be authorised by a particular committee. However the authorities never convened this committee. The disregard for authorized procedure obscured the principles of the sport for everybody involved because it showed that anything might be dropped or added at any time with out the least consideration to the principles spelt out by regulation. This, in flip, undermined the credibility of the election administration our bodies in addition to the election itself (see AAN’s reporting right here).
  • Third was the inefficiency and shortcomings of the related establishments. For example, the push for biometric voter verification was stimulated by considerations on the part of the political events that the guide voter registration was flawed, as pretend tazkeras had been used and thus the voter lists can be fraudulent and unreliable. The Afghanistan Central Civil Registration Authority (ACCRA) was liable for issuing tazkeras beneath the Memorandum of Understanding it had signed with the IEC. It was the duty of ACCRA to make sure pretend tazkeras weren’t distributed and in the event that they have been distributed, that they might be detected, nevertheless it was unclear whether it had a reliable database for the IEC to be able to cross-check voter registration knowledge.

Provided that the parliamentary elections have been held three years late, voters might have anticipated a much better election. As it’s, taking seven months to finalise the outcomes of this grossly-delayed election has solely added weight to the conclusion that electoral reform has failed. With the politically much more necessary presidential election looming, the prospect of a well timed and truthful poll for Afghanistan’s next leader within the autumn has been made slimmer.

Edited by Sari Kouvo and Kate Clark

(1) Radio Tv of Afghanistan (RTA) revealed (see here) the listing of the winners from Kabul before it was revealed by the IEC. Sources from the IEC advised AAN that that they had a printout of the outcomes, which they had to have a remaining take a look at to ensure it was accurate. It took them virtually two hours to do this, during which era it was leaked (whereupon the RTA obtained a replica).

(2) Article 83 of the structure says:

Members of the House of Individuals shall be elected by the individuals by means of free, basic, secret, and direct balloting.

The work interval of the House of Individuals shall terminate, after the disclosure of the results of the elections, on the first of Saratan of the fifth yr and the brand new Parliament shall begin work.

The elections for members of the House of Individuals shall be held 30 to 60 days previous to the expiration of the term of the Home of Individuals.

The variety of the members of the Home of Individuals shall be proportionate to the inhabitants of each constituency, not exceeding the utmost of 250 people.

Electoral constituencies, in addition to different associated points, shall be decided by the elections regulation.

The elections regulation shall adopt measures to achieve, via the citizens system, common and truthful representation for all of the individuals of the nation, and proportionate to the population of each province, on average, at the least two females shall be the elected members of the House of Individuals from every province.

(Three) Parliament’s winter recess ended on 15 Hut 1397 (6 March 2019), however the president refused to inaugurate it with the previous members. In accordance with article 42 of the principles of procedures, the Wolesi Jirga has a 45 day-long summer time recess from 1 Asad to 15 Sunbula and a 45 day-long winter recess from 1 Dalw to 15 Hut (21 January to six March 2019).

(Four) An MP from Ghazni, in dialog with AAN, claimed that the State Minister for Parliamentary Affairs, Faruq Wardak, and Second Deputy Chief Government Engineer Muhammad Khan who hails from Ghazni and some other Hezb-e Islami affiliates primarily from Ghazni did not need Ghazni MPs to attend the inauguration of the Nationwide Assembly. In response to the MP, Wardak and others had argued that, based mostly on the structure, the new parliament must be inaugurated with the brand new MPs and Ghazni MPs were not new. The MP claimed that that they had acquired an indication that Wardak and others had satisfied the president of this as properly.

The Ghazni MP stated this contravened article 104 of the electoral regulation, which states that when an election is just not held in a constituency, the previous MPs can proceed to work till the election is held. He contacted Wardak to examine whether or not or not this was true and he confirmed it, the MP stated. The MP went on to say that he then met Chief Government Abdullah to boost the difficulty with him and, in his presence, Abdullah spoke with Wardak on the telephone and promised to speak to the president, too.

The MP stated that minister Wardak had then requested the Supreme Courtroom, the Fee for Overseeing the Implementation of the Structure, the IEC and the ECC verbally they usually had all stated that the Ghazni MPs ought to stay in the workplace till new MPs have been elected, and they should be invited to the inauguration.

(5) Article 88 of the electoral regulation says:

The Commission is obliged that after the announcement of the ultimate election results, it shall situation an award a Certificates of Election to the President, Members of Wolesi Jirga, elected members of Meshrano Jirga members of the Provincial Councils, members of the District Councils, members of the Village Councils, mayors and the members of the Municipality Councils.

(6) Article 87 of the structure:

Every of the 2 homes of the Nationwide Meeting, on the commencement of their work interval, shall elect one member as president for the time period of the legislature, and two members as first and second deputies and two members as secretary and assistant secretary for a interval of one yr.

These individuals shall type the administrative teams of the House of Individuals in addition to House of Elders. Duties of the executive groups shall be determined by the Laws on Inner Duties of each house.

(7) Article 4 of the Wolesi Jirga Guidelines and Procedures says:

  • At the first sitting of the Jirga, the oldest Member, who just isn’t a candidate for the place of Speaker, shall be appointed as Pro Tem Speaker.
  • The oldest Member shall present his or her id card to the Secretary-Common as a way to be appointed Pro Tem Speaker. The national id card (Tazkara) shall determine the age of the Member.
  • If there are two or extra Members of exactly the same age, the Professional Tem Speaker shall be appointed by lottery.
  • The two youngest Members of the Jirga, who will not be candidates themselves, shall be appointed as Deputy and Secretary to the Pro Tem Speaker.
  • The tactic of election of the Secretary and Deputy to the Professional Tem Speaker of the Jirga shall be in accordance with clauses 3 and 4 of this text.

(Eight) It referred to as for the dismissal of 5 current and former IEC officers named (head and deputy of the IEC secretariat, Ahmad Shah Zamanzai, and Abdul Aziz Samim, respectively, and the top of IT, Sayyed Ibrahim Sadat, head of subject operations, Zmarai Qalamyar, and former head of Kabul IEC, Awal ul-Rahman Rudwal) for “mismanagement, violation of laws, laws and procedures of the electoral commissions and failure to train authorized authorities and obligations on well timed basis which led to widespread electoral violations and crimes.” (AAN reporting here.)

(9) On 15 April 2019, the ECC held a consultative assembly with election observer groups concerning the Kabul elections. In line with its report, the representatives of the election observers confused that probably the most widespread election fraud had been dedicated in the course of the recount of the Kabul votes and this needed critical attention. They believed that reviewing the end result sheets from election day and addressing the objections and complaints from the Kabul elections would yield passable outcomes.

On 21 April, the ECC consulted representatives of political events. In response to its report, the evaluate of election day end result sheets and the recount part of Kabul votes, identifying ghost votes and nullifying Kabul votes have been discussed by the political get together representatives. (10) On 25 April 2019, the ECC made the following selections: 1) all of the paperwork associated to the attraction instances for Kabul province ought to be quarantined and sealed by the ECC members within the ECC headquarters; 2) all the critiques, audits and recounts carried out (by the outgoing IEC and ECC) have been to be annulled; Three) all the end result sheets from the first and second day (20 and 21 October 2018) of the elections within the specified polling centres and stations, having fulfilled the required criteria of the election procedures and laws have been to be thought-about valid; Four) the IEC is obligated to offer all the documents associated to Kabul to the ECC; 5) all the unique outcome sheets from the first and second day (20 and 21 October 2018) of the elections ought to be quarantined and sealed by the ECC members within the location specified by the IEC, and; 6) all of the IEC and ECC employees ought to cooperate significantly and comprehensively in addressing the Kabul instances.

Annex: Under is the desk for the brand new MPs from 33 provinces plus ten Kuchi MPs and one Hindu and Sikh representative.

1. Kabul: the most important constituency with 33 seats, including nine for ladies. The outcomes have been announced on 14 Might, late night. The primary 24 are male and the remaining 9 are female.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 384 Haji Ajmal Rahmani 1-1186-37 11,158 2.0
2 152 Al Hajj Abdul Qayyum Khairkhawh 1-1442-4 Eight,748 1.5
Three 528 Khan Agha Rezayi 1- 1162-88 7,850 1.Four
Four 217 Al Hajj Mullah Muhammad Khan Ahmadi 1-1283-128 6,727 1.2
5 297 Feda Muhammad Ulfat Saleh 1-1389-78 6,690 1.2
6 34 Ahmad Jawid Jaihun 1-1537-14 6,213 1.1
7 469 Mir Amanullah Guzar 1-1164-56 6,zero95 1.1
8 45 Al Hajj Amir Gul Shahin 1-1188-22 6,061 1.1
9 2 Ghulan Hussain Naseri 1-1479-47 6,024 1.1
10 788 Dr Ramazan Bashardost 1-1704-56 5,983 1.0
11 79 Al Hajj Sayyed Muhammad Muhammadi 1-1704-56 5,339 0.9
12 749 Al Hajj Allah Gul Mujahed 1-1521-25 5,198 zero.9
13 432 Haji Khan Muhammad Wardak 1-1185-51 5,128 zero.9
14 430 Al Hajj Qazi Mir Afghan Safi 1-1265-55 Four,628 0.Eight
15 89 Najibullah Naser 1-1023-75 Four,401 0.8
16 529 Habib-ul Rahman Sayyaf 1-1297-60 4,014 0.7
17 220 Anwar Khan Oryakhel 1-1432-81 Three,885 0.7
18 477 Sufi Abdul Razeq Estalefi 1-1224-77 3,749 zero.7
19 84 Tawfiq Wahdat 1-1066-102 3,716 0.7
20 475 Haji Zergai Habibi 1-1444-12 3,594 0.6
21 535 Muhammad Naim Wardak 1-1249-30 3,520 zero.6
22 354 Haji Hafizullah Jalili 1-1209-19 Three,449 0.6
23 484 Erfanullah Erfan 1-1176-45 3,429 zero.6
24 129 Obaidullah Kalimzai Wardak 1-1010-32 Three,418 zero.6
25 760 Wakil Fatema Nazari 1-1577-5 2,736 zero.5
26 631 Common Nazifa Zaki 1-1228-11 1,441 0.3
27 608 Shinkai Karokhel 1-1711-104 1,406 zero.2
28 377 Mursal Nabizada 1-1686-124 1,396 0.2
29 324 Fawzia Naseryar Guldarayi 1-1220-1048 1,287 0.2
30 19 Rubina Jalali 1-1330-1 1,259 0.2
31 375 Mariam Sama 1-1818-141 1,255 zero.2
32 575 Zuhra Nawruzi 1-1072-78 1,223 0.2
33 266 Bibi Haji Parwin Durani 1-1588-Three 1,149 0.2

 

2. Kapisa: it has four seats, including one feminine seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 17,952 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 34 Mirdad Khan Nejrabi 2-1249-103 5,849 15.1
2 21 Engineer Mir Haidar Afzali 2-1685-42 5,370 13.9
3 15 Common Muhammad Iqbal Safi 2-201-1142-13 5,355 13.9
4 33 Khadija Elham Khalili 2-1274-34 1,378 Three.6

 

3. Parwan: it has six seats, including two for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 52,988 votes forged.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 16 Abdul Aziz Humayun Harirud Three-1593-34 14,690 17.1
2 12 Al Hajj Mir Rahman Rahmani 3-1093-1 10,693 12.4
3 1 Sediq Ahmad Osmani Three-1541-2 9,961 11.6
4 17 Al Hajj Abdul Zaher Salangi 3-1441-18 9,329 10.8
5 7 Zakia Sangin Three-1306-4 5,415 6.Three
6 24 Master Samia Aziz Sadat 3-1177-15 2,900 Three.Four

 

Four. Maidan Wardak: has five seats, including two for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 26,407 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 7 Al Hajj Abdul Ahmad Durani 4-1185-6 7,731 13.2
2 Eight Abdul Rahman Wardak 4-1593-8 6,893 11.7
Three 26 Muhammad Mahdi Rasekh Four-1297-27 6,zero25 10.2
Four 18 Halima Askari Four-1541-31 Three,219 5.5
5 30 Engineer Hamida Akbari Four-1477-40 2,539 Four.Three

 

5. Logar: four seats, together with one feminine seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of Four,427 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %

 

1 1 Muhammad Khaled Momand 5-1437-22 1,474 9.5
2 29 Shahpur Khan Hussainzai 5-1022-41 1,361 Eight.8
Three 12 Engineer Muhammad Asef Nabizai 5-1185-12 1,016 6.5
Four 30 Humma Ahmadi 5-1397-27 576 3.7

 

6. Nangrahar: has 14 seats, together with three for ladies. The elected candidates characterize a total of 86,104 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 2 Abdul Karim Karimi 6-1274-12 10,437 3.9
2 7 Feraidun Khan Mumand 6-1441-9 8,311 3.1
Three 92 Malek Qais Nur Aghah Malekzai 6-1401-31 7,966 Three.zero
4 36 Abdul Rauf Shpun 6-1593-83 7,706 2.9
5 73 Amir Muhammad Yar 6-1265-145 7,137 2.7
6 69 Nabiullah Baz 6-1185-6 7,106 2.6
7 71 Mirwais Yasini 6-1297-32 6,858 2.6
Eight 82 Al Hajj Hazrat Ali 6-1034-57 6,463 2.4
9 56 Abrarullah Murad 6-1093-99 6,273 2.Three
10 20 Nayaz Wali Muslim 6-1261-172 5,652 2.1
11 72 Arian Yun 6-1609-7 4,446 1.7
12 41 Bibi Haji Lailuma Wali Hukmi 6-1305-78 3,340 1.2
13 32 Saima Khogyani 6-1330-69 2,692 1.0
14 84 Anisa Omrani 6-1637-235 1,717 zero.6

 

7. Laghman: four seats including one feminine seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 11,740 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 23 Common Abdul Munir Tarakhel 7-1297-6 Four,048 9.1
2 10 Muhammad Rafi Mamuzai 7-1174-64 Three,zero21 6.9
Three 19 Engineer Muhammad Alem Qarar 7-1441-13 2,884 6.5
4 1 Al Hajj Zifnon Safi 7-1305-2 1,787 Four.zero

 

8. Panjshir: two seats including one feminine seat. The elected candidates characterize a total of 10,033 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 12 Haji Zal Muhammad Zalmai Nuri Eight-1265-2068 8,456 27.2
2 Four Qazi Rahela Salim Eight-1250-7 1,577 5.1

 

9. Baghlan: eight seats together with two for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 43,271 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 72 Al Hajj Asadullah Shahbaz 9-1274-91 8,738 7.2
2 Four Muhammad Azem Mohesni 9-1329-120 6,481 5.Three
3 25 Atiq Ramin 9-1541-33 5,828 Four.8
4 44 Al Hajj Mamur Ahmadzai 9-1249-41 5,508 Four.5
5 86 Dr Muhammad Nasim Mudaber 9-1009-48 Four,895 Four.0
6 41 Al Hajj Ustad Abdul Razaq Hashemi 9-1273-15 Four,345 3.6
7 69 Shurkia Essakhel 9-1197-54 Four,701 Three.8
Eight 62 Nurian Hamidi 9-1553-9 2,775 2.3

 

10. Bamyan: 4 seats including one female seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 35,662 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 38 Muhammad Rahim Aliyar 10-1297-134 10,529 Eight.4
2 1 Al Hajj Zahiruddin Jan Agha 10-1461-3 9,945 7.9
Three 35 Sayyed Muhammad Jamal Fakur Beheshti 10-1094-8 9,021 7.2
Four 29 Nekhbakht Fahimi 10-1009-62 6,167 4.9

 

11. Paktika: has four seats together with one female seat. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 11,094.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Canadidate No Votes %
1 18 Muhammad Mirza Katawazai 12-1182-12 5,142 17.6
2 24 Nader Khan Katawazai 12-1665-Eight 2,756 9.5
Three 6 Khalid Asad 12-1234-72 2,701 9.3
Four 5 Suraya Akbari 12-1133-64 495 1.7

 

12. Paktia: has 5 seats together with one female seat. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 12,145 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 56 Muhammad Ibrahim Ghukhtalai 13-1173-46 3,206 6.Three
2 18 Dr Yarbaz Khan Hamidi 13-1298-62 2,544 5.0
Three 76 Nasib Muqbel 13-1289-10 2,465 Four.Eight
Four 1 Sayyed Hassan Gardizi 13-1141-5 2,214 4.Three
5 30 Razia Saadat Mangal 13-1542-1075 1,716 3.4

 

13. Khost: has five seats including one female seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 23,086 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 7 Kamal Naser Osoli 14-1541-88 7,758 9.7
2 11 Engineer Helmand Helmand 14-1593-47 4,438 5.6
3 12 Dr Muhammad Musa Khawarin 14-1001-92 4,202 5.Three
4 17 Ghaffar Khan 14-1637-2 Four,127 5.2
5 22 Sahera Sharif 14-1505-17 2,561 3.2

 

14. Kunar: has four seats together with one feminine seat. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 23,577 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 5 Jawid Sapai 15-1437-1006 6,909 8.Four
2 19 Ustad Neamatullah Karyab 15-1273-6 6,326 7.7
3 24 Ziaurahman Kashmir Khan 15-1665-1024 6,zero36 7.3
4 8 Wazhma Sapai 15-1233-5 4,306 5.2

 

15. Nuristan: has two seats together with one feminine seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 2,761 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 1 Ismail Atikan 16-1297-19 2,271 16.Four
2 7 Dr Omar Banu Akbari Nuristani 16-1606-1337-36 490 Three.5

 

16. Badakhshan: has nine seats together with two for ladies. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 54,450 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 51 Abdul Rauf Enami 17-1553-23 7,392 4.6
2 52 Abdul Shakur Waqef Hakimi 17-1585-6 7,zero60 4.4
3 41 Hujatullah Kheradmand 17-1461-78 6,598 4.2
Four 72 Abdul Wali Neyazi 17-1233-47 6,524 4.1
5 23 Mawlawi Zabiullah Attiq 17-1445-46 5,707 3.6
6 69 Fazl Azem Zalmai Mujaddedi 17-1169-15 5,589 Three.5
7 18 Dr. Ahmad Zia Yaftali 17-1313-12 5.508 Three.5
Eight 69 Nilofar Ibrahimi 17-1537-10 6,717 4.2
9 13 Sadeqa Adib 17-1477-79 3,355 2.1

 

17. Takhar: has 9 seats including two for ladies. The elected candidates characterize a total of 67,724 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 1 Abdullah Bek 18-1141-Four 13,818 7.9
2 4 Rais Abdul Baqi Malekzada 18-1050-257 8,469 Four.Eight
3 15 Muhammad Alem Sa’i 18-1094-24 7,762 Four.Four
4 46 Engineer Amir Muhammad Khaksar 18-1429-13 6,985 4.zero
5 5 Ghulam Sarwar Sadat 18-1274-18 6,835 3.9
6 52 Dr Sayyed Ashrafuddin Aini 18-1225-Three 6,767 Three.9
7 12 Dr Hamiduddin Yoldash 18-1269-10 6,380 Three.6
8 61 Habiba Danesh 18-1339-87 5,817 3.3
9 20 Nazifa Yusufi Bek 18-1009-79 4,891 2.Eight

 

18. Kunduz: has 9 seats together with two for ladies. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 16,378 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 62 Al Hajj Abdul Rauf Ibrahimi 19-1265-30 2,986 5.7
2 21 Engineer Kamal Safi 19-1185-43 2,276 Four.Four
3 32 Shah Khan Shirzad 19-1142-9 1,996 3.8
4 31 Engineer Muhammaduddin Hamdard 19-1141-13 1,905 Three.6
5 2 Muhammullah Batash 19-1273-Eight 1,699 Three.Three
6 13 Haji Muhammad Omar Khan 19-1553-42 1,631 Three.1
7 49 Fazel Karim Aimaq 19-1149-35 1,586 Three.zero
Eight 5 Nilofar Jalali Kufi 19-1161-47 1,257 2.4
9 67 Dr Fatema Aziz 19-1226-56 1,zero42 2.zero

 

19. Samangan: has four seats together with one female seat. The elected candidates characterize a total of 27,681 votes (http://www.iec.org.af/results/en/home/final_leadingcandidates_results/20).

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 28 Hayatullah Samangani 20-1685-1020 9,256 12.2
2 23 Makhdum Abdullah Muhammadi 20-1418-1 9,000 11.Eight
3 25 Ziauddin Zia 20-1241-2030 6,261 8.2
4 Three Ustad Mahbuba Rahmat 20-1185-1006 Three,164 Four.2

 

20. Balkh: has 11 seats together with three for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 97,727 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 68 Ghullam Abbas Ibrahimzada 21-1185-10 17,543 9.zero
2 2 Ahmad Shah Ramazan 21-1329-1 11,238 5.Eight
Three 74 Alam Khan Azadi 21-1074-27 10,448 5.Four
4. 43 Abdul Hamid Sharifi 21-1141-9 10,148 5.2
5 36 Sayyed Zaher Masrur 21-1306-Three 10,zero30 5.2
6 65 Muhammad Ali Mohaqeq 21-1118-4 9,683 5.0
7 58 Gul Rahman Hamdard 21-1273-58 9,598 4.9
Eight 53 Rais Abdul Khaleq 21-1257-28 9,486 4.9
9 47 Saifura Nayazi 21-1049-81 Three,377 1.7
10 15 Fawzia Hamidi 21,1250-64 Three,157 1.6
11 52 Breshna Rabi 21-1150-78 3,zero19 1.6

 

21. Sar-e Pul: has 5 seats including one female seat. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 34,621 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 13 Muhammad Akbari Sultanzada 22-1185-1 9,242 12.1
2 20 Sayyed Muhammad Hassan Sharifi Balkhabi 22-1094-16 7,358 9.7
3 31 Al Hajj Hamidullah Bek 22-1297-72 6,260 Eight.2
Four Three Haji Sayyed Hayatullah Alemi 22-1417-91 5,746 7.5
5 32 Aziza Jalis 22-1305-22 6,015 7.9

 

22. Ghor: has six seats together with two for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 57,361 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 Eight Muhammad Ibrahim Malekzada 23-1441-56 19,438 17.5
2 12 Atta Muhammad Dehqanpur 23-1094-12 11,828 10.6
Three 19 Keramuddin Rezazadah 23-1605-59 8,823 7.9
Four 17 Gul Zaman Naib 23-1329-89 8,131 7.Three
5 5 Fatema Kohestani 23-1541-1 5,247 4.7
6 28 Ruqia Nail 23-1581-Four Three,894 3.5

 

23. Daikundi: has four seats together with one female seat (two female MPs have been elected from Daikundi this time). The elected candidates characterize a complete of 46,705 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 15 Sayyed Muhammad Daud Naseri 24-1441-6 13,055 9.7
2 35 Raihana Azad 24-1297-16 12,680 9.4
3 Three Ali Akbar Jamshidi 24-1581-41 10,490 7.8
4 Four Shirin Mohseni 24-1325-65 10,480 7.8

 

24. Uruzgan: has three seats including one female seat. The elected candidates characterize a total of 3,367 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 6 Besmellah Jan Muhammad 25-1593-33 1,420 11.4
2 7 Qudratllah Rahimi 25-1313-24 1,394 11.2
3 12 Bibi Gulalai Muhammadi 25-1601-1 553 Four.Four

 

25. Zabul: has three seats including one female seat. The elected candidates symbolize a total of 3,767 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 5 Abdul Qader Qalatwal 26-1461-2 1,825 14.1
2 15 Hamidullah Tokhi 26-1593-5 1,458 11.2
3 6 Zahra Tokhi 26-1273-7 484 3.7

 

26. Kandahar: has 11 seats including three for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a total of 50,797 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 52 Sayyed Muqtada Miran 27-1387-10 7,282 Four.6
2 95 Dr Mahmud Khan Nasrat 27-1197-41 6,377 Four.1
3 53 Rohullah Khanzada 27-1009-57 6,312 Four.0
4 82 Haji Sayyed Ahmad Khadem 27-1329-15 5,700 3.6
5 1 Gul Ahmad Kamin 27-1177-21 5,118 3.Three
6 104 Sayyed Ahmad Silab 27-1010-16 Four,120 2.6
7 29 Khalil Ahmad Mujahed 27-1401-20 Three,967 2.5
Eight 19 Engineer Muhammad Aref Nurzai 27-1561-34 Three,893 2.5
9 48 Freba Ahmadi Kakar 27-1541-2 Three,500 2.2
10 31 Malalai Ishaqzai 27-1232-70 2,826 1.8
11 36 Parwin Nama 27-1577-62 1,702 1.1

 

27. Jawzjan has 5 seats together with one feminine seat. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 35,691 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 6 Haji Batur Dostum 28-1141-1030 20,045 36.0
2 15 Batash Ishchi 28-1441-3 6,818 12.2
Three 12 Muhammad Karim Jawzjani 28-1397-11 4,159 7.5
4 23 Azizullah Ulfati 28-1437-1025 Three,515 6.3
5 28 Halima Sadaf Karimi 28-1505-17 1,154 2.1

 

28. Faryab: has 9 candidates together with three for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 30,360 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 5 Hashmatullah Arman 29-1541-1007 Eight,772 12.7
2 53 Muhammad Rasul Faryabi 29-1226-2033 4,166 6.zero
3 14 Sanjar Kargar 29-1141-2015 Three,563 5.2
4 11 Muhammad Hashem Khan 29-1545-Three Three,466 5.zero
5 50 Sayyed Babur Jamal 29-1505-2034 3,174 Four.6
6 59 Muhammad Shaker Karimi 29-1334-2038 3,064 Four.Four
7 62 Rangina Kargar 29-1329-2014 1,519 2.2
8 55 Shafiqa Sakha Yulchi 29-1346-2026 1,355 2.zero
9 46 Al Hajj Fawzia Raufi 29-1005-2 1,281 1.9

 

29. Helmand has eight seats together with two for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 19,792 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 12 Muhammad Zafar Sadeqi 30-1034-19 4,038 5.3
2 65 Haji Ghulam Wali Afghan 30-1194-24 Three,267 4.3
3 2 Mirwais Khadem 30-1309-32 3,084 Four.1
Four 60 Al Hajj Muhammad Karim Atal 30-1092-26 2,651 3.5
5 4 Abdul Rashid Azizi 30-1545-5 2,494 Three.Three
6 85 Shir Muhammad Akhundzada 30-1022-39 2,317 3.1
7 21 Nasima Nayazi 30-1174-29 1,320 1.7
8 75 Shegufa Nurzai 30-1685-83 621 0.Eight

 

30. Badghis: four seats together with one female seat. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 14,572 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 10 Zaiuddin Akazai 31-1142-2 Four,575 10.Four
2 13 Abdul Basir Osmani 31-1333-29 Four,509 10.3
3 8 Amir Shah Naibzada 31-1185-64 4,162 9.5
Four 12 Ustad Farida Bekzad 31-1441-35 1,326 Three.0

 

31. Herat: has 17 seats including five for ladies. The elected candidates symbolize a complete of 116,569 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 110 Habiburrahman Pedram 32-1469-1137 16,835 5.2
2 144 Muhammad Reza Khushak Watandost 32-1329-Four 16,275 5.1
3 51 Omar Naser Mujaddedi 32-1405-1092 10,896 3.4
Four 154 Haji Muhammad Sadeq Qaderi 32-1141-26 9,663 3.zero
5 92 Ghulam Faruq Majruh 32-1161-6 7,zero27 2.2
6 142 Ustad Hamidullah Hanif 31-1317-1128 6,950 2.2
7 8 Munawar Shah Bahaduri 32-1441-10 6,811 2.1
Eight 40 Haji Shahpur Popal 32-1257-1075 6,549 2.0
9 161 Sayyed Azem Keberzani 32-1105-1118 6,517 2.0
10 105 Qazi Nazir Ahmad Hanifi 32-1074-46 5,963 1.9
11 113 Al Hajj Ghulam Faruq Nazari 32-1074-46 5,963 1.9
12 128 Sayyed Taha Sadeq 32-1081-1096 5,729 1.8
13 45 Rahima Jami 32-1078-1064 3,118 1.0
14 44 Masuda Karokhi 32-1225-1123 2,824 zero.9
15 130 Nahid Ahmadi Farid 32-1461-17 1,957 zero.6
16 30 Simin Barakzai 32-1249-1110 1,665 zero.5
17 115 Shahnaz Ghawsi 32-1685-1068 1,662 zero.5

 

32. Farah: has five seats including one female seat. The elected candidates symbolize a total of 8,524 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %

 

1 17 Humayun Shahidzada 33-1397-26 2,457 9.7
2 37 Abdul Satar Hussaini 33-1305-Four 1,859 7.4
Three 11 Abdul Nasir Farahi 33-1541-1 1,642 6.5
Four 40 Abdul Ghaffar Arman 33-1505-16 1,468 5.Eight
5 39 Belqis Roshan 33-1142-15 1,098 4.4

 

33. Nimruz: has two seats including one female seat. The elected candidates characterize a complete of 12,148 votes.

No Poll No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 11 Gul Ahmad Nurzad 34-1033-16 5,812 18.8
2 9 Farida Hamidi 34-1390-6 6,336 20.5

 

34. Kuchis: there are ten Kuchi seats, including three for ladies. The elected candidates characterize a total of 49,033 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 37 Al Hajj Shah Wazir Tarakhel 35-1231-77 21,738 32.7
2 26 Habib Rahman Afghan 35-1185-61 5,148 7.7
3 21 Mirwais Hussiankhel 35-1780-1100 Four,671 7.zero
Four 25 Nangyalai Lawang 35-1687-23 Four,147 6.2
5 5 Haji Parwiz Arabzada 35-1687-90 Three,629 5.5
6 17 Al Hajj Haidar Jan Naimzoi 35-1186-15 Three,270 4.9
7 11 Rasul Khan Kuchi 35-1439-17 2,853 4.3
8 31 Hamida Ahmadzai 35-1585-85 1,940 2.9
9 9 Mariam Sulaimankhel 1-1080-172 839 1.Three
10 1 Farzana Kuchi 35-1672-151 798 1.2

 

35. Sikh: there’s one seat reserved for the Hindu and Sikh communities in a country-wide constituency. The elected candidate has a total of 303 votes.

No Ballot No Candidate Identify Candidate No Votes %
1 1 Narender Singh Khalesa 1-1217-259 303 100.0